Context, interpretation and intent clash in controversial St. Louis art exhibit

Visitors to the Contemporary Art Museum are now (Sept. 30, 2016) greeted by warning signs and a wall that went up in front of Kelley Walker's Direct Drive exhibit following criticism and outrage of the work. CAROLINA HIDALGO | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

Visitors to the Contemporary Art Museum are now (Sept. 30, 2016) greeted by warning signs and a wall that went up in front of Kelley Walker's Direct Drive exhibit following criticism and outrage of the work. CAROLINA HIDALGO | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIO

ON THIS EPISODE ... we bring you the story of how a controversial exhibit at a St. Louis museum exposed a long-running debate in the art world about identity, power and race. We're joined this week by arts reporter Willis Ryder Arnold, who's been covering the issue at the city's Contemporary Art Museum for months. It centers on the artwork of a young, white man from Georgia whose pieces include images from black culture and media that are then digitally altered. The work has been shown before, but when it came to CAM this past fall, it ignited a fierce debate — at dinner tables, in bars, on blogs. We step back and examine what happened, where things when wrong, why they did it and what people are doing about it. 

 

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